Welcome!

My name is Daniel Mackler and I am a musician, filmmaker, Youtuber, and writer based in New York.  I also worked for ten years as a psychotherapist in New York, though I ended my therapy practice in 2010.  My creative work focuses on the destruction of our natural environment and the causes, consequences, and significance of childhood trauma.  I see childhood trauma as ranging from the extreme, which is common, to the mild, which is so much more common that few even notice it at all, much less call it by its proper name.  I view the norm in our culture as being highly traumatized and I view the average, and even above-average, childhood as being extremely traumatic – and the average parent as lacking both awareness of this and deep empathy for the child.

I see our world growing more pathological, confused, polluted, overpopulated, and disturbed by the day – and I feel that to stand by and say nothing while we destroy our planet is, at the least, irresponsible.  Yet I write with great hope – both for individual healing and for the collective healing of our world.  I seek to offer a new perspective – on relationships, on manifesting the best of ourselves, on the potential value of celibacy, on parenting, on the pathology of the family system, and on the future of our species.

Of note:  I recently made a page for older comments from this welcome page to my website, because the hundreds or perhaps thousands of comments were making this page terribly slow to open!!

109 thoughts on “Welcome!

  1. Hi Daniel,

    I am glad to hear your thoughts about having children and subtle forms of abuse that occur from parent to child.

    As a mother of a 3-year-old it was hard to hear but I think I’ve known these things deep down but never found the words to describe. Although excruciating, I’m now in the process of examining myself, and starting to think and act in ways that I hope will help my daughter.

    I do not think we should give up hope of being able to improve the experiences of children in our society.

  2. Hi Daniel, my name is Nick and I recently came across your videos on YouTube. Pretty much everything you say resonates with me. I became a therapist after going to Rutgers grad school in 2013. I’m about to be ten years into this profession and a part of me wants to quit. I did do a lot of good in the last several years and I’m proud of it. I even earned a Humanism award from a foundation that funded the agency I worked at. I want to quit because I’m disgusted with some of the people I’ve worked with. I share your views on therapy and it was nice to know I’m not alone. And like yourself I desire to do other things. I’m also a musician. There was a time when I studied Percussion in college. I passed my juries at the end of the first year and I switched majors. I didn’t leave music and in fact I’ve been slowly making my way back into it. I play in a jazz band with some nice people which hopefully is just the beginning of my return to music. Thank you for the inspiration and thank you for being honest about yourself and honest about Psychotherapy.

  3. Hi Daniel, you have been a therapist for 8 years right? So in those times do you have any clients who have Algophobia (fear of physical pain)?. 
    And Daniel, I have been going through Algophobia ever since my childhood. because when i was young, one day i was playing with my friends and suddenly i fell on the floor which broke my elbow and it was very painful. anyway it got healed after some months but from that time onwards i started fearing physical pain. So Daniel, I have some questions if you reply them one by one it will be very helpful for me;

    1.  I don’t wanna take any medication to treat my algophobia. Is medication important to treat this phobia? What if this is severe? 

    2. And as i am currently going through algophobia, now i also fear other things like electricity, fire etc as all of these causes pain and physical distress. So can a good psychologist be able to get me out of all of these? 

    3. Is there even any HOPE for me to get out from this without medication? 

    • You REALLY should look into EFT and phobia or EMDR or phobias, primarily because you have a clear traumatic memory and psychogenesis of your symptoms.

      These kinds of modalities help you re live that event and process the memory which in turn should heal that fear of pain. It these modalities tend to have long term results in comparison to things like CBT etc.

  4. Hi Daniel,
    You have just crossed my youtube path and to be honest I never reach out like this but I have just watched your Questioning Forgiveness video from 4 years ago and basically, YES YES YES to that message!!!
    For a long time, I struggled with the concept of forgiveness and finally decided that some things are simply unforgiveable and all the bypassing that happens everywhere only deepens the trauma.
    Firmly laying down the blame where it truly belonged (psychologically and emotionally) was such an act of self-love and left me feeling so free and so much lighter as I no longer carried that BS around.
    Thank you for your videos. They are such an inspiration.
    Best wishes from Scotland

  5. Hi Daniel,

    I simply want to thank you for your bravery to put yourself out there and be a friend or a companion to so many of us. It’s so hard to find anyone who respects and fully empathizes with the child’s perspective. With your videos and your essays I feel less lonely and I’m so grateful to you.

    All the best,
    Simon

  6. Daniel, I’m watching this youtube channel that criticizes the government and politicians as being our slavemasters and oppressors. I think that person’s criticisms of the government are ultimately correct, but it’s still so boring to listen to!! Even people like that who criticize the government are still stuck in a loop where it’s all they can talk about.. and they still fail to express their true inner creativity. That’s just how most adults are I suppose – whether they support the government or oppose it, they’re still boring and cannot tap into their inner child. It feels like I’m stuck in history class again, bored out of my mind. For me, this reinforces what you say about how politics reflects our family dynamics, and how we should focus on our family dynamics instead. You couldn’t be more right on that IMO.

  7. Hello Daniel,

    I have watched most of your YouTube videos, and I believe that you have discovered something very big here! I applaud your courage for not diluting the message of your discovery!

    As someone who very likely has RAD (Reactive Attachment Disorder) due to childhood trauma, I am at a loss on how to proceed towards wellness. The usual approach is the therapeutic model, but as you know, finding a good therapist is very difficult. Do you have any advice for someone like me?

    • Hi Greg,
      Hmm…perhaps some form of self-therapy would work? Journaling? Finding ways to get in touch with deeper feelings? I think most people have some form of Reactive Attachment Disorder (if you want to use that term), though some definitely more extreme than others… I think a lot of the tools I share about for self-therapy might be useful for this, it’s just a question of picking and choosing what works best for you. My self-therapy book might be useful too — perhaps? Or maybe you already have tried it?
      Wishing you only the best!
      Daniel

      • Hi David
        I’m wondering what your thoughts are on ketamine assisted therapy. I used to see a therapist and she was big on talk therapy at first, then it was all about bioenergetics and now it’s this new ketamine assisted therapy. I don’t know anything about this type of treatment and would love to know your thoughts.. thanks!!
        P.

        • Hi Polly,
          I’ve never tried ketamine assisted therapy myself, but I would be quite skeptical. Ketamine is a very strong drug and I’ve known some people who have had pretty nasty reactions to it. I made a whole video about doing Ayahuasca for healing, and if you can find that, that pretty much sums up my point of view on using heavy drugs like ketamine and mushrooms and MDMA for therapeutic purposes. Perhaps they could help some people but I much prefer a natural healing path that uses no drugs at all. It’s less risky and also the person knows they’re doing the healing from within, versus needing to use some external drug to change their life. All the best to you, Daniel

          • Hi!
            Thank you for your response. Honestly I was feeling pretty skeptical about it myself. I’m not in therapy and don’t feel a need to be. I was in therapy for almost six years with the same therapist. In the beginning we did a lot of psychodynamic talk therapy… it was a slow process but I felt the most comfortable going that route. About 6 months in she was strongly encouraging me to engage in bioenergetic therapy which I was super uncomfortable in… it was physically painful and made me feel uncomfortable emotionally as well. I have since stopped therapy as I felt secure and at peace with myself . So fast foreword a few years later to now and on her Instagram and FB she is big time advocating for Ketamine assisted therapy. I was given Ketamine after major surgery to help with pain while in the recovery room… it helped me with pain but I can not imagine using a psychedelic drug in therapy! I find it concerning how in 2013 my therapist really believed in psychodynamic therapy… then she leans towards bioenergetic therapy.. and now all she talks about is Ketamine assisted therapy. It just doesn’t sit well with me.
            Thanks again!!
            Polly

  8. Hey Daniel,
    I have been watching your videos lately and they have helped me a lot. I have never seen someone else bring up the problems in psychiatry so well, so it feels good being able to relate to it all.

    Recently i just left a clinic where i was treated horribly, and i was misdiagnosed as possibly psychotic, depressed and anxious, and with a body dysmorphic disorder. All my attempts to bring up developmental trauma were ignored or shut down. One doctor downright said that apparently years of being bullied and isolated by all my peers cannot traumatize a person.

    I am now in the process and trying to get them to be responsible for what they did, and having my distorted diagnoses removed from my record. Confronting the people that i saw there is scary for me, and i am afraid that the shame and freeze response will kick in when i talk to them again like it always does. Do you have any advice for me on how to move on with this? I wish i never went to that place because they made my symptoms worse, and no one obviously believes me over any authority figure.

    • Hi Pineapple,
      I’m so sorry to hear about what you went through. I’m also sorry to share that unfortunately it is very common. In terms of what you shared, about “having my distorted diagnoses removed from my record,” basically, from all that I’ve seen over the last 20 years, it unfortunately is just about impossible to get anyone to change your medical record. I have seen people try and try and try many many times and basically no one gets anywhere. They will almost never admit wrongdoing and the people who try to get them to change end up wasting a lot of energy and bringing themselves more pain. I know this news is not good, but this is what I have observed. Back when I was a therapist I also tried to help people get their records changed and even then I got nowhere. I talked about this in one or two videos but I can’t remember which ones. Maybe I should make a video specifically on this topic, because it’s a good topic. Wishing you only the best on your journey forward. Daniel

    • ” One doctor downright said that apparently years of being bullied and isolated by all my peers cannot traumatize a person.”

      Wow, as someone who’s no stranger to being bullied in K-12 as well as by family members, I know that couldn’t be further from the truth. Anyone who says something like that is in denial, hasn’t been bullied but has little empathy for those who experienced it, or is likely a bully themselves.

      • That doctor did show some other bad signs too. I sensed no empathy, and sometimes when i made a logical argument against her empty claims, she just remained silent for 2-3 seconds and then continued like i never said anything. She also had this weird subtle smirk/smile on her face often. I never figured out what that meant, but i have read that some narcissists do that.

        • I really understand what you are going through. I wanted to complain about my therapist who was an expert at retraumatising me, and did not really believe in childhood trauma. I found a lovely therapist who had wanted me to put in a complaint, but she warned me that I would meet a very defensive institution and that in itself would be re-traumatising. I decided to leave it, and focus on my own battle for self-acceptance. I did not have a registered diagnosis to fight, so I really feel angry on your behalf. I agree with Daniel (who is enlightening and such a gift to us) that you are probably best continuing your own healing journey, but make note of what has been said by people in support of you. That might be useful in the future.

  9. Jesus said forgive them for they know not what they are doing. when I started attributing god to my life I found grace and healing. without god you can do nothing. when there where one set of footprints in the sand that was god carrying me through the tough times in life.miracles happen all the time but if you don’t recognize the power of god in your life, and being thankful like the Bible describes there will BE GNASHING OF TEETH and suffering. I recommend the course in miracles and anything from Jidda Krishnamurti. these are not religious books or christian ideology. The only thing that can heal is the spirit. not therapy not people not yourself. GoD alone. good luck wish you all the best Daniel.

    • I really love your perspective. However, when you say that God alone heals, what does that mean? Are we not all potential instuments of healing in God’s great symphony. Will he not use any of His creation to promote healing? Does God bring into existence all kinds of herbs and plants (and human beings) for our healing? Surely, God alone is the Healer, and then how does that manifest in the realm of creation?

    • You say “Without God you can do nothing.” I would revise that as “Without God I can do nothing. Without God, Scott Sombers can do nothing.” If God has helped you, then that’s great. But you shouldn’t speak on behalf of other people – we are not all the same person. If God was so helpful, then why do we need to shove it down peoples’ throats?

      Religion and spirituality are often used by abusers to let themselves off the hook for their actions. A kind person does not demand forgiveness, he takes responsibility for his actions. I recommend the youtube video “Narcissistic Pseudospirituality” by Dr. Ramani. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rzD-GZBTQVI

      • Apologies—the “universal you” was intended. However, I agree that it is more succinct to think in terms of “I” or “one.” Thank you for your response.

      • Hi Pat. I do know that narcissists and abusers love the idea of being g forgiven but that’s ok. Im not saying to continue to allow people to abuse. However if we continue our lives in the past and identify as a victim of something. Then that is our destiny. To never move on. Once u can forgive and not the narcissist but the one before the narcissist became. If u know what I mean. Then u can be forgiven and live in the now and forget the past and future. Narcissus are extremely weak hurt and desperate individuals that are pitiful sad. Why fight with them. It’s a waiste of energy. Everyone is the same before they become conditioned therefore we r all one therefore if I cannot do anything without god then either can anyone. Because we r the same.

  10. Hey, is there information somewhere about the damage that SSRIs or other psychiatric drugs can do? I have eaten some of them when i was still a teenager for a few months at a time at most, and i have been thinking if they somehow affected my physical development. I haven’t found much information on this anywhere. I don’t mean the temporary side effects, but the possible long term effects like hormonal problems etc.

    • Hi Curious! Hmm, maybe rxisk.org or madinamerica.com
      I’m not sure about hormonal problems as a result of psychiatric drugs, but I definitely would not be surprised if it’s possible. Then again, I have known a lot of people who have had problems with their thyroids after lithium.
      Wishing you the best,
      Daniel

  11. Hi Daniel,

    Just want to thank you for your work. It’s helped me a lot. I broke with my parents about 2 years ago. I’ve struggled to find good resources that support me through the healing. I’ve got your book on the subject and I’ve found all your YouTube videos very helpful as well.

    I think it’s brave of you to speak out so boldly about a topic many struggle or refuse to understand. Breaking with my parents has cost me other relationships. I’ve got a new perspective on my present life and my past. Some days I struggle with doubt and guilt about this new path, but your content has helped me stay focused on my truth.

    I’ve got a long journey ahead, but it’s comforting and inspiring to know that someone else found a way and made it through.

    Thank you for what you do.

  12. Any comment on the notion that psychology/psychiatry were hijacked by a UK/U.S. project around the 1940s and 1950s?

    Videos if you want to watch
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vHXGSMpgX5U
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f-HPZhGYQAE

    There is quite a bit of evidence that the public information about MKUltra was meant to distract from its real purpose, hence the reason Richard Helms destroyed one group of documents but not another.

    Weltanschauungskrieg is a German word for ‘world view war’, and this project was meant to globalize a psychiatry paradigm which would benefit Western Europe, or more specifically the UK worldview.

    • Walter,

      Daniel has a video about conspiracy theories (I’m not saying that MKUltra is a conspiracy theory – merely that he has a video with his thoughts on conspiracy theories.) He doesn’t talk about MKUltra in that video, but I left a comment mentioning MKUltra, and Daniel replied saying he agrees that MKUltra is an example of a conspiracy theory that turned out to be true. Besides that, I don’t think he has a video where he talks about MKUltra specifically.

      That being said, many of Daniel’s videos criticize psychiatry and psychiatric medications, as you’re probably already aware of.

      (To be honest, I haven’t really done any proper research on MKUltra myself. It’s a topic that interests me, but I don’t know how to begin doing proper research and verifying the evidence. All I’ve done is watch a couple documentaries on it, which is of course not research.)

      • *Also, what you said about the official, public version of MKUltra being a cover for its real intention (to hijack the field of psychology/psychiatry) makes sense. If the official version was the true one, then we’d never have heard about it.

        But if the goal was to hijack psychology/psychiatry, then my question is, what did the field of psychology/psychiatry look like before it was hijacked? Was it better than it is today, or was the field always one that was severely lacking in truthful insights into trauma and the human mind?

        And also, how exactly would these secretive projects have gone about hijacking the field? Officially, we’re told that people were confined and experimented on with various drugs including LSD. Do you think there’s more to it than that to facilitate the hijacking of the field?

        And it really is awful that a certain nation or empire would try to forcefully and cruelly shift a world view in their own favor – in favor of their own profits. It’s awful that they would try to change human psychology just for their own benefit. Daniel’s channel happens to be one that focuses on family dynamics, rather than exploring what’s going on in society at large that would lead to such abusive dynamics. The macroscopic view is something that Daniel’s channel doesn’t really address (and I’m not criticizing him for that, I’m just stating it how it is.)

        And because of this, I think Daniel has a tendency to put 100% of the blame on the family system. But to be fair, it’s very hard to have an understanding of these corrupt social dynamics. These aren’t exactly mainstream topics, and you have to look in some unusual places to find this sort of information – things which might easily cross into the conspiracy theory threshold if you’re not extremely open minded.

  13. Guys, I’ve had a few things happen today that released a lot of emotions. I feel amazing about myself for like the first time in my life. It made me realize how rarely I feel like this. DANIEL WAS RIGHT. I am a beautiful soul, and I want to connect other beautiful, intelligent, empathic, radiant souls.

    It made me realize that I live with a monster of a father who will do anything to crush that beauty in me – physically and verbally. I lived for so long thinking I didn’t have any positive traits. But I am bursting with positive traits. They had just been suppressed for so long.

    And like I said, this positive feeling is incredibly rare. First time in my life. Most of the time, I live with a lot of self-hatred.

    • Good on you Pat B

      Daniel is a visionary, maybe in 50 or 100 hears he will get the recognition he deserves. His work informs my work.

      As for fathers, mine is a covert narcissist so his abuse is far more subtle, he doesn’t mean to, but cant help himself and wont do any deeper work himself, as a holocaust survivor, hes just to damaged.

          • In my research, It is apparent, to me at least, that it is the grandchildren of the holocaust survivors that get hit the hardest. Any thoughts?

            • Thats an interesting theory, for sure my nieces and nephews are struggling. I have tried to stop the transmission by being in psychotherapy for years, then trained as one and also done loads of other self development work. Time will tell.

            • Christine, your theory is interesting because it takes into account our ancestry and history when factoring in trauma. However, as someone whose traumas have gone unheard and unnoticed my whole life, it does bother me when people try to claim there is a certain group that has “endured more” than another.

              But again, what you propose is very interesting, because there could be all sorts of things that happened in history that could affect present day family dynamics and abuses. For instance, what if someone in the family committed murder, or was the victim of murder? Or what if they had committed a cruel act during a war, or were the victim of a cruel act in war? I have no doubt these things would have a huge impact – it’s just not a connection our society ever addresses.

  14. Daniel,

    I’ve been really enjoying your content on Youtube. You have a fascinating mind. I don’t mean to label you, but I’d be shocked if you weren’t an INFJ. Regardless,I sincerely thank you for your willingness to share your ideas.

    I was hoping you’d be generous enough to impart wisdom on me regarding psychotherapy. I’m a new therapist who is struggling to find much value in the commonly taught modalities. I’m an incredulous person by nature, and I can’t bring myself to practice method on clients that I wouldn’t practice on myself. It all seems inauthentic and shallow at this point, but I do truly want to help people.

    I gather you practiced eclectically, but would you be willing to share book recommendations, approaches, or other sources that you actually found credible? What positively impacted your practice? What informed you?

    Many thanks,

    – JW

    • Hi JW,
      Greetings and thank you! I can’t reply much at the moment because I’m away from my computer and have almost no Internet. But I will reply in a few weeks! Warm hello,
      Daniel

    • I pegged Daniel as an INFJ as well because INFJs tend to be people who possess introverted natures but are visionaries others can come to for counseling. I also happen to be a fan of Myers-Briggs and other personality typing systems.

  15. Hi Daniel,

    There’s something that I’m curious about and after watching your video about quitting therapy on YouTube, I thought that you would be the perfect person to ask.

    Did you in your practice ever deal with people who had issues with a normal (i.e. non-extreme) religious upbringing? My feeling is that there is a ton of overlap between the aims and categories of spirituality and those of psychotherapy. My sense is that therapy is taking the place of religion and spirituality in the secular epoch, almost becoming a secular religion (people go to therapists seeking the same help that they would have sought in a priest/pastor/rabbi earlier). Perhaps this is fine for those who need such spiritual transformation, but it would also seem to imply the same problems of subjectivity and authority, and the potential for psycho-spiritual damage, inherent to religion.

    I notice how it is always the same spiritual people who gradually replace (or integrate) their religious terminology with therapy terminology. Once religion comes to seem too authoritarian it is replaced with spirituality and once spirituality is discovered to contain an element of the arbitrary it is replaced by therapy. But the same operations, and the same arbitrary authority, remain present.

    One might object that either way it is a personal choice, except that as psychotherapeutic language and categories become more popular, it becomes increasingly difficult to avoid those who would irresponsibly insist on having an influence on one’s mind.

    How can one trust in the conceptual vocabulary of psychotherapy as it gains so much popular authority (thereby evading, say, social issues and recasting every issue as a personal one)? How can one be of a skeptical-critical mind without going crazy by the gaslighting normalized by those wishing to define what is and is not normal?

    Regards,
    Ronald

    P. S. What is your favourite novel and why?

    • Hi Ronald,
      Sorry for my short reply but I am presently in a place that has almost no Internet and I am without my computer. I will reply in a few weeks. Sending you a hello.
      Daniel

  16. Daniel,
    I feel so overwhelmed when I imagine finally connecting with likeminded souls, overwhelmed at the idea of living in a world where our creativity is nurtured. I don’t know why it terrifies me, despite being something I’ve always longed for. I too wish the world would just hurry up and resolve its traumas already. But the idea of feeling all these feelings, of getting to express my inner beauty without having to hide it.. It gives me a knot in my stomach, as if I just ate something rotten. It is terrifying. I’d much rather just hide in my room all day.

    Is this simply a defense mechanism where I’m afraid to be myself, because so many people crush us and hurt us for being ourselves? Or is there more to it?

  17. Hi Daniel,

    I’m glad of having discovered your YT channel. On a video where you’ve done 20 predictions for the next 20 years, you’ve said people who break from their parents will exit the parent cult and want to meet other folks. You know how society is, still the majority will treat you bad if you don’t agree to the family value system and it’s hard to find suitable peers without expressing publicly your views.
    Do you have any channel like a Facebook page or a forum or some other way where your followers can gather and search for other peers, maybe more suited to their geographic area?
    I’ve lived for 20 years(I’m 33) in chronic loneliness and it was coupled with many years of major depression and self doubt,thinking there was something wrong with me. In the last couple years I’ve come to the realization I was sane and intelligent but I was not lucky of having met the right people.
    Thanks!

    • Hi Ned,
      Alas, I don’t have any kind of forum like that. It’s a good idea, and it would be great if someone created it, but I don’t have the energy to do it myself.
      I am wishing you the best!
      Daniel

      • There is a website and forum called out of the fog for people that have personality disordered parents, siblings or partners. I found this to be quite supportive in my own journey of separating from my dysfunctional family of origin

    • The thought of meeting face-to-face with likeminded souls is a dream.. But also quite overwhelming. It’s so much easier to just sit in my room all day and avoid meeting anyone, even if they feel the same way I do.

      • @Pat B I’ve lived in loneliness for 20 years, but I can say I have the luck of having one very good friend that has been super good to me but also a lot older than me. She’s been more of a mother but very friendly and jokes a lot, in complete contrast with my biological mother who is very strict and suffering from (undiagnosed) schizoaffective disorder.
        But contact with peers and society is very much needed and healthy, even for me that I enjoy my solitude I feel like I’m slowly dying by not having a richer connection with society. I don’t want to necessarily meet people with my same mindset, it’s more interesting to meet people with complementary traits than ourselves, but I need a common ground based on respect and to not be judged as insane given my perception of the world.
        I think that’s the main issue with modern society, there is a lack of letting “weird” people express themselves.Ancient cultures had the figure of a shaman who was one of the most respected figures in society, he lived at the edge of the tribe/town. He wasn’t engaging much socially(apart from cerimonies) but people back then knew that life is not only about the material and for existential or crisis in their lives they went to see a shaman so to have a different perspective of their problems. Now I’m not sayiing me or most weirdos have the capabalities and knowledge of a shaman, but the way society treated them was by first considering they were either in contact with spirits or gifted with unconcentional wisdom, before they would had been judged automatically as strictly mentally sick or unrecoverable.

    • Come join Reddit raised by narcissists;
      Cptsd; and narcissistic parents forums. This sounds like what your looking for. And sounds exactly like myself/everyone else on the forums. Many of us are NC from our family of origins. Understanding what happened helps tremendously with the loneliness/healing. Turns out…my story is almost identical to people on those forums and Daniel from his videos. And I met one of us in person…who was already a friend of mine for a year. Not a coincidence. We are finding each other.

  18. Hi Daniel,

    I’ve recently picked up a book at the library called, “A Way of Being,” written by Carl Rogers. It’s a collection of essays and reflections on his life and career. I’ve also read some of his ideas in miscellaneous quotes online, and I think I really like his ideas and worldview. Could you tell me what you think of Carl Rogers?

    Thanks,
    Chris

    • Hi Chris,
      I’ve read a few Carl Rogers book (none in the last 15 years, though). I feel mixed about him. He was actually one of the first psychologists I read. I remember reading “Counseling and Psychotherapy” and feeling like I couldn’t make sense of it, especially all the direct transcripts he put in of his conversations with clients. I did get a feeling that he was a gentle and caring man (and I feel this still), and I got the feeling that these were important qualities in a therapist, but past that it didn’t help me at all — and maybe it even made me feel insecure because I couldn’t follow his line of thought. A few of his other books I found more understandable (and again I liked his gentleness), but then I read part of his book on encounter groups and I felt like he’d gone weird… I wasn’t into that at all… It felt culty to me, from what I remember…
      Daniel

  19. Hey Daniel, I just watched something that proves your point about “what lies beneath our leathery hides.” (I’m sorry if this is too graphic for your website) – but I watched a video of a teenager getting stabbed by a store owner 7 times for an attempted robbery. It was absolutely brutal to watch. I don’t think the store owner had to go that far – it’s as if he was itching to hurt someone his whole life, and he finally got the opportunity to let out all that rage. I think this was about more than just whatever product the kid tried to steal. I saw the video on Reddit, a popular social media site – and I checked the comments.. Many people were defending the store owner, and throwing jeering comments at the teenager. I feel that these people are just as emotionally detached as the store owner. I think this shows how our society empowers cruel behavior from emotionally detached people – how our laws protect people like the store owner, and how emotionally detached people cover each others’ backs. I used to fear that raggedy person on the street – the teenager or the homeless person – but now I know who the real danger is, who has the leatheriest of hides: it’s probably the normal, well-adjusted, wealthy person who owns a business, runs a shop.

    I also look at sports as another example of something that brings out peoples’ hidden rage and cruelty. There are probably lots of examples of violent acts committed in sports, by fans and players – I’ve even seen a famous soccer manager poke another soccer manager’s eyes! There’s lots and lots of money that goes into sports, which is a huge red flag to me. You just know it’s gonna be full of sleazy, cruel behavior.

  20. Hi daniel, nice to meet you. (Also sorry for my bad english).
    I know you are a therapist no more. But as you were a therapist 10 years ago and had some knowledge and experience in the field of psychological therapy, I want you to tell me If my condition Is treatable.
    So sir my question is will my this condition be treatable and curable? I don’t want to take any medication so are there any other forms of treatments available for my this condition?
    My story is,
    I had an accident some months ago and got injured, bleeded a lot, my bones fractured and dislocated and yeah… it was very painful. From that i start Fearing pain. I fear that something painful may happen to me.
    After that incident, I also started developing some phobias including Algophobia(fear of pain).
    When I remember my accident incident I suddenly shock and cry a lot and now slowly going into a state of depression too.
    Not only that, Now i fear other things too like, electric shocks, acids, poison, Vomiting, death without getting air or oxygen, choking and many other things. I fear after Even if I see or hear about these things because all of these things leads to physical pain and other physical troubles.
    Another thing is that, When I see any disturbing news like murders, other things like death of people by electric shocks, chocking etc, I start fearing, get sad and get depressed when thinking about the pain and other physical troubles those people had experienced at that time and then i cry a lot. when I see them screaming in pain it also makes me sad, Fear and depressed. It also triggers me a lot.
    I don’t wanna live anymore in this painful world.
    Sometimes I wish I would have never even existed.
    All these things are affecting my psychological and mental health very negatively.

    • Hi Andrew,
      I’m sorry for my delay! Well, it certainly sounds like you were quite traumatized from the accident you experienced, and I see no reason why what you’re experiencing now is a post-traumatic reaction.
      So with that in mind, I see no reason why you can’t heal from it and move on with your life in a healthier way. The question is how to heal from the trauma. There are many possibilities, and I hope you find one that works for you. I write some about self-therapy on this website, and I have videos on it. That might help you. Perhaps a good therapist would also, though sometimes they can be hard to find. I don’t recommend psychiatric drugs, just so you know.
      I am really wishing you the best,
      Daniel

    • Hi Andrew, I’m so sorry for your experiences. It may be helpful if you can find a therapist who specializes in trauma or post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). They may be able to help you through various treatment modalities, like exposure therapy or cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) or dialectal behavioral therapy (DBT).

      There are also self-workbooks on Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Retrain-Your-Brain-Behavioral-Depression) that help you walk yourself through treatments, but given your strong reactions, I think you could benefit from working through these issues with guidance from a provider/therapist/social worker/etc.

      Your reactions since your accident sound completely reasonable to me, however, if you don’t seek treatment (therapy not medication), you may struggle your entire life. The sooner you find help, the better. Yes, finding a therapist is so difficult, so I would ask friends and family and maybe educational institutions where you live for recommendations.

      Also – you MUST stop triggering yourself by allowing yourself to be exposed to the trauma’s of others. Don’t read sad stories or watch sad/difficult things on the Internet/where ever.

      I limit my exposure to media intensely, because I’m very empathic and the pain of others becomes mine. I was hit by a train as a child and struggle with similar issues to you and these are my recommendations. Take them or leave them, but please seek help from a professional. I’m so sorry for your struggles & wish you the best. 🙂 Kat

  21. Hey Daniel! If you have the time, out of curiosity I’d like to ask: had you ever had clients with selective mutism during your time as a psychotherapist? I ask because I had it as a child and it made for some traumatising interactions with my parents. I’ve read it’s not a disorder that is caused by trauma but I’ve grown rather skeptical of that claim, especially seeing as a lot of child abuse/neglect in society never even registers as trauma to people in the field. It’s incredibly rare to see this disorder mentioned at all anywhere so I couldn’t help but wonder if you have any thoughts on what could make a young child suddenly develop this disorder out of blue.

    Regardless, thanks for your videos, as they’ve been very helpful in untangling my trauma and making me aware of a lot of the corruption in the psychiatry field I didn’t know about!

    • Hi Alex,
      Yes, I had clients with it, and once a friend who had it intensely as a child, and also I had it a few times in my life as well. I don’t know about what caused my friend to have it (though his father did abandon him and his mother), but I did see in the case of my clients and in my own case that it was definitely trauma-based. It wasn’t safe to talk — to speak my mind — to express my feelings, to be me. Being me was dangerous and going silent, beyond conscious control, was safer for me. When I felt safer (by getting away from the awful people and also by healing my traumas) I could talk again, without a problem. I saw the same with clients. There is also a person in my film Take These Broken Wings (on youtube) who was selectively mute for a while. It seemed pretty clear it was trauma-based in her case too….

      Greetings,
      Daniel

      • Whoa, that is actually fascinating, because from my personal experience escaping my parents ‘cured’ my selective mutism too – and I definitely recall instances where I’d receive angry and rejecting confrontations from a parent about the fact I refused to talk about ‘why I’m like this’ which needless to say made me freeze and go nonverbal even more out of fear, because I was afraid speaking would escalate the situation even more. Many thanks for your response – I’ve been meaning to check out your documentary too, and this is gonna be an additional reason to do so now as it’s so hard to find people with similar early experiences and it can feel isolating at times. Very surprised to hear you struggled with this too!!

        • Hi Alex,
          I think I should make a video on selective mutism. It’s a good topic and I think it’s more common than people realize. Also, the woman in the film of mine that was selectively mute was in the middle of a deep psychotic break, and, come to think of it, I’m not sure if she was actually selectively mute, but maybe mute all the time — for a period of years. But I think the film also makes it clear that her issue was trauma related. Meanwhile, sending you good vibes! Daniel

          • If making a video on the subject truly interests you then I think it’d be a fantastic idea – there are such little resources and info on selective mutism as it is, and I feel like there’s got to be a lot of people affected by it who would really appreciate the visibility of a more (in my experience at least) stigmatised anxiety disorder like it. Especially considering current data seems to be reluctant to consider trauma to be the cause of the condition!

            Appreciate the vibes, take care. 🙂

  22. Hello Daniel,
    I was hospitalized twice with psychosis. I was diagnosed bipolar. I take olanzapine now. I like what you say about trauma being part of it because I totally see connections to trauma in my psychosis. I know you are against pills. If I go off the pills, what is the alternative? What do you think I should do for recovery? Thanks

  23. Have you heard anything about psychedelics triggering a dramatic increase of intelligence? Experienced it after taking ayahuasca to say a Genius level even it eventually went away 3 months later but dont see much on it out there. Some say its kundalini but idk much about it.

    • I have never heard of that, Andrew. I’ve heard of people have very altered perceptions of themselves, though, after ayahuasca (and have experienced that myself). Meanwhile, what you’re describing sounds a bit like the book Flowers for Algernon — a classic book. In that case the main character was mentally retarded to begin with, though — different from your case. But still, it was a very interesting book — worth a read if you haven’t seen it.
      Daniel

  24. Hi Daniel, I always see things as simple and valueless. Like, if I eat my favourite ice cream while enjoying it and after a while I get thoughts like ”uh! It’s just ice cream”. If I see a beautiful starry night I would be very amazed while seeing it. But later I get thoughts like ”uh! it’s just a starry night.. Nothing else”. These type of thoughts also make me very sad and depressed as I see everything as simple and valueless. I get thoughts like ”uh! it’s just a ‘physical thing’ it will die over time.I don’t need to show love/interest towards that. It is just temporary”. Also I get thoughts like ”uh! All things are temporary. no need to show interest/love towards them”. So how do I deal with these?

    • Hmm, Tim…good question…. Off the top of my head (I’m fried right now, too much work) I’m not sure what to say. Maybe others can contribute here. Also, I really welcome others who read these comments to feel free to jump in and answer as best they can. I know there’s a lot of wisdom here!
      Daniel

    • Thanks, Daniel, for inviting responses from your “Wild Truth” community!
      Hello Tim, I feel that what you are expressing is very valuable. Without context the beauty of the starry night is just what you said . The sadness may originate from a place that needs, indeed requires aforementioned context. Don’t try to push away your insights or even try to stop feeling sad. Kierkegaard, who followed every idea to its “illogical final point,” loved his melancholy as he felt it was a genuine consequence of his stellar insights.

  25. Hi Daniel, when you were psychotherapist have you ever trained in doing forms of therapy like EMDR, psychodynamic therapy, cbt etc?. And have you ever perform any of these therapy to any of your client at that time?

    • Hi Guiso,
      Psychodynamic therapy, yes, and some CBT — though I more just followed my own path and not any prescribed method. EMDR, no. I tried EMDR myself a couple of times and didn’t like it — didn’t do anything for me. I’ve talked to some people who have said it’s helped then and others who said it overwhelmed them and made them feel worse — even to the point of psych hospitalization. Daniel

  26. Hi Daniel, thank you for your video on why you ended up leaving your job as a therapist. Have you seen/experienced severe burnout, and do you have any suggestions on what to consider before stepping away from the field? Appreciate your time.

    • Hi Marty– severe burnout, no. I was heading in that direction, though, before I stopped. Suggestions — well, maybe fewer clients, more breaks. Or a big break… More fun things. More focus on one’s own needs and not just the needs and feelings of others…
      Daniel

  27. Hello I’m currently working on a research paper for an English class about certain questions that we have about the profession we want to enter. I chose psychology because to be honest with you I have a fascination about this field of study and I enjoyed having my lecture in class. My question to you is (and I hope this isn’t a bother) If our mental health is as important as your physical health shouldn’t health insurance providers cover therapy sessions for us? Why is therapy labeled “so expensive”? Is the salary of a therapist excused? should they make more, or should they make less?

    • Hi Daniel,
      Hmm…perhaps I’m not such a big fan of therapy anymore… I often think therapy is too expensive, though I think if a therapist is really great then maybe it’s worth a high cost. But I think, and this is based on my experience, that most therapists are not very good and really are just running a racket. They really don’t have much to offer people for their mental health struggles and sometimes are just downright bad and hurtful. And so much of the mental health system nowadays, especially when it comes to people with more serious problems, is about putting people on drugs. And the people who fund the system use that very argument– “our mental health is as important as your physical health”– to get more people put on the meds. I think it’s awful… And a lot of times the therapists themselves are the conduits to get people stuck on the drugs. It’s part of their training and very hurtful…
      But a good therapist who really knows how to help a wide variety of people — very rare and very wonderful. And often, from what I’ve seen, these people charge LESS money. It’s because they have more of a heart.
      Daniel

      • Wow. Found your site looking up projective identification on YouTube. It’s very helpful to hear you say this, having been a therapist.

        After a truly hellish time working with too many trauma therapists, including a very famous and very expensive one who forgot her own protocol because she was looking through the eyes of my mother introject, I have concluded psychotherapy (and particularly trauma therapy) is inherently flawed. It depends on one party to be unerring and experience no cognitive distortions. The profession encourages the narcissistic viewpoint that in the case of any relationship difficulties, the client is automatically wrong and the therapist is almost never projecting on the client. I believe this idea is totally false. I think therapists develop countertransference, aren’t humble enough to work through it, and terminate their clients for their own convenience all the time. ALL THE TIME.

        I believe the therapists doing the particular protocol that harmed me are empathetic and begin “receiving baby’s transmissions” of how my abusive mother felt and thought about me when commencing the protocol. The therapist is very prone to confuse this information with their own perceptions of the client — and then the therapy is doomed. Worse yet, the therapy is harmful when performed in this state, so the clients are left destabilized and never knowing what hit them. Many times the therapist walks away feeling like they did something good for the client (must be something wrong with THEM that the therapy didn’t work!)

        I’m doing my own art, music and dance therapy at home from now on. I will never trust a therapist again. I’ve been harmed so much more than helped. Most of the growth I’ve experienced has come from figuring out what the therapist should have on my own.

  28. Dear Daniel,
    Thank you for your thoughtful work.
    I am an ACSW who will have acquired the requisite 3,000 hours for licensure in a few months.
    I wonder, when you were working as a psychotherapist, if you ever had days, one of which I had today, when you felt like an inept therapist?
    Although you did list the (perhaps adjacent) enormous responsibility as a reason, you did not list occasions of feeling inept as being one of the 6 reasons you stopped being a psychotherapist; but it is certainly a reason that – when it happens – leads me to want to exit the profession. Mostly I feel as if I’m helpful – which is the whole point of the job – but when I feel the opposite of helpful, it feels horrible and discouraging.
    Sincerely,
    SSB

    • Hi Sara,
      Yes, sometimes I surely felt inept — but that was more early on in my work. I think I shared about this in a few videos, but I can’t exactly remember where. Later in my work I did sometimes, perhaps even often, feel that I wasn’t necessarily helping people in a way I could clearly see, but that didn’t necessarily then translate in my mind to my being inept. Sometimes I felt instead that they were just very stuck — or perhaps that I just wasn’t a match for them. Or perhaps I felt that they just needed more time — or I needed more time to think out creative solutions. But early on I did often feel tormented at feeling inept — especially when I read books by grandiose therapist-healers of their “wow” successes, and also had supervisors who admitted no flaws or weaknesses…tiresome and sad… Anyway, wishing you the best! Daniel

  29. Hey Daniel, have you heard of the work of Lloyd deMause?

    https://psychohistory.com/articles/the-history-of-child-abuse/ is a speech from him, it seems he convincingly concluded that sadistic cruelty towards children has been the rule throughout history.

    In particular, one idea of his is that children are used and abused as “poison containers” that parents can dump all their toxic waste into.

    His observations perfectly match with what you talk about. It really is a pity that the entire topic is not discussed much, and parents are somehow thought to be naturally benevolent, which is not supported by history at all.

    Thanks again for all that you do!!!

    • Hi Charles,
      Yes, I do know his work and I read a couple of his books. I found them mostly excellent. I also exchanged some emails with him about fifteen years ago, before he died. But unfortunately I never met him, even though we both lived on the same island — Manhattan.
      And thank you for your kind words–
      Daniel

  30. Hi Daniel, what type of therapist you were? Clinical psychologist? Childhood trauma therapist or just truama specialist? Also when you were therapist you also had clients who had problems like anxiety, depression, ocd, phobias, ptsd etc Instead of childhood trauma?

    • Hi Shriya,
      My license was as an LCSW — a licensed clinical social worker. But that really told nothing about what type of therapist I was, as it was only a license. I worked differently with each client I had. I always thought about trauma with my clients, but some people didn’t want to talk about their traumas (or didn’t realize they had any) and I didn’t push the subject. I also worked with clients of all sorts of problems — pretty much everything imaginable. I also focused on working with adults.
      Daniel

  31. Hi Danial, I have been following your channel in YouTube for the past few days, it is quite interesting!
    I actually knew your channel from a search on YouTube, about studying psychology, and I found out that you have the same background as me, I am a biologist also, but I have a huge interest in psychology. But my problem is that I cannot differentiate weather my interest is result of an actual interest or unresolved trauma, I am now deciding between a very good Phd position in my field, or studying psychology on my own, if you have an interest and time to advice me I really appreciate it.

    • Hi Salwa — Hmm, I’m really not sure what to say! Perhaps journal about it more to figure out what your motives are?
      Daniel

  32. Hi Daniel,

    First of all’ i’m kinda surprised that you consistently reply to most people here which i guess it’s not always easy
    Secondly, i have a few unrelated topics that i’d love to hear your response:

    1. i’ve noticed that throughout a a few of your videos you mention that it is really stressful for you to sit and film your opinion and truth publicly for people to see. While i intuitively get that, as personally beginning my own healing journey just 2 years ago, there is a part i’m almost not ready to except. How are you, such a profound and strong person that talks so much about healing trauma and went through so many internal and external challenges, is still very stressful about talking his own truth?

    2. you were born in 1972 and you’ve mentioned that you used to go a lot to nature around you. We’re you also “raised by TV” for a period in your childhood? or watched a lot of it at least? i’m mainly asking since i was born a lot later than you (1995) and for me TV and cartoons were a big chunk of my childhood, which mainly were like a continuation of the pacifier and a great distraction from the pains of trauma and neglect. Later also i slowly transitioned to the computer and internet as a main distraction which still lingers to this day. This force of convenient distraction is a one a still struggle with, but on the other hand i find that by remembering or stumbling across old shows and cartoons recently helps me a bit digging up the past. Did you ever experience anything similar?

    3. Generally i’m noticing more and more that it is very hard to live in our modern world and society when trying to stop dissociating. Not just on the interpersonal level of interactions and honesty with other people around you, but also almost everything else. For example, i’ve watched a short video about the conditions of chickens in farms that produce (chicken) meat and farms for eggs. i’m already trying to be maximally vegan but just watching that was soul crushing, and the only way yo actually keep consuming these stuff is to completely dissociate. Together with the state of the world of collapsing climate and ecosystems, pointless wars, silly corruption and neglect of even basic infrastructure (in many countries) and so many other problems – is both depressing and anxious. i guess i mainly vented here but if you have any suggestions on how to deal with trying to learn and live your truth in such a background it would be helpful.

    So thank you Daniel for being who you are,
    with warm regards,
    Roman.

    • Hi Roman,
      Sorry, I’ve hit that point where at the moment I don’t have the energy to reply… I did my best to reply to your other comments, though!
      Thank you for your kind words, also!
      Daniel

  33. Daniel,
    Hi there! I see how often and how quickly you reply to messages on your website, and I wanted to thank you for how much effort and energy you put into answering questions!
    I just wanted to ask you what your opinion is on the phrase “it’s better to be alone than in bad company” in the context of having healthy friends? I ask because I moved to a new city at the beginning of the pandemic, where I didn’t know anyone. It was also around this time that I started my healing work, and I haven’t been able to find any friends in my new city that I feel are really healthy and on board with being honest and true. Is it better to hold out for people that are honest and true or are possibly unhealthy friends better than no friends?
    Thanks for all you do!
    -Ricky

    • Hi Ricky,
      greetings! Yes, sometimes I have some extra energy and time to respond (and sometimes to respond quickly). Sometimes not… Hmm, I think I actually addressed that topic in a video on friendships. I know for myself I do spend a lot of time alone if I don’t have good friends, but at other times (especially when I’m traveling in foreign lands) I make friends that I might not otherwise have. Also the same when I was younger — some friends were better than no friends!! But I have some pretty bad friends at certain points, and when it comes to that, nowadays, I’d definitely rather be alone!!
      Warm greetings,
      Daniel

  34. Hi,
    I want to know resources on how to deal with Schizoaffective disorder bipolar type. I’ve been taking meds since 2007 and can’t afford to get an alternative psychiatrist. Are there any books specifically to deal with the disease (Schizoaffective disorder bipolar type)?

    Thanks.

  35. Hi Daniel Nice to meet you, I have a problem.(also sorry for my bad english)
    When I was young I slipped and fell on the floor. It fractured a bone in my finger and was very painful. After a few days it was cured. But I am now experiencing the following:
    1: I feel anxious that something painful like this Or something more painful than this will happen to me in future. And if anything like that happens then after that I become so much sad and will go into a state of extreme depression for sure. I also become again anxious too. I get a sudden shock feeling when i remember about that physical pain i experienced that time.
    AND from there on, I start feeling anxious towards “physical pain” And get sad and depressed whenever I think about other people’s huge physical pain they’ve experienced.
    2. I also feel depressed whenever I think about the Physical pain I have experienced at that time. Whenever i see any disturbing scene in news or at tv i gets triggered and then i goes into a state of sadness and depression. somedays ago i saw a documentary of hiroshima bomb exploding in japan.were 6000°c of heat hits people and whenever i think about those peoples physical pain they’ve experienced at that time, i becomes so much sad and depressed. Sometimes these things also pop up in my mind in the form of images were those small babies and peoples screaming and crying in that physical pain. some weeks ago i saw a video titled “ancient brutal torturing methods” it made me even more triggering and my condition became even worse. i also gets triggered and become depressed and sad when not only think about physical pain instead, when i hear or saw other physical problems too like Vomiting,dying without getting oxygen etc etc…! i gets triggered whenever i hear or saw some words like “unbearable pain” or “unimaginable pain”.I feel sad and depressed whenever I think about the person who has experienced the biggest amount of physical pain in this world. I also get scared when I think about these kinds of things
    If there is anything in this universe worse than physical pain,I feel anxious and depressed when I think about it.
    These kinds of thoughts are unacceptable and unbearable for me.
    I want to get treatment but I don’t wanna take any kind of medication. I hate that and I will never take that. no matter what ! . Anyway now I start feeling ”HOPELESS”.
    I feel like there would be no treatments that will work for me. there will be no solution for my problem. I feel like therapists are bad. Forms of therapy are useless. my mind started saying something like “There will be solutions to only some problems, not for all”. I am really losing hope now. Now what will I do? Will there be any solution?

  36. Hello, I need urgent help. I took invenga sustenna for 6 months and it has destroyed my life, it took away all my dopamine and now I can’t sleep. Without sleeping I might get a heart attack or a seizure soon. My psychiatrist says it can’t be invenga but prior to get the injections I was fine and sleeping well. They should have never given me those injections. Can you help me?

    • Nina — well, Invega is an antipsychotic and lots of people coming off antipsychotics experience insomnia. If you google “Invega withdrawal side effects” you’ll see insomnia there, so I don’t know what your psychiatrist is talking about. It’s also possible you came off too fast. I’d recommend checking out the Withdrawal Project: http://withdrawal.theinnercompass.org
      They might be able to be useful to you. Wishing you the best,
      Daniel

  37. Hi daniel, I have 11 questions about psychotherapy and so on… Please answer in detail each question wise if possible.
    1: I often heard that many people say that therapy and meds don’t work. So what shall those people do?
    2: Is there any evidence that Therapy ever does much for anyone ?
    3: I heard that Therapy and psychology just gives a “positive effect” for people and it doesn’t solve any problem. Is that true? 4: psychology/therapy isn’t focused on diagnosing mental problems so that they can be solved. just talking about one’s daily life and the problems they experience on a day to day basis endlessly…!
    one guy commented that ”it just enables people to have emotional issues by putting them under a magnifying glass without fixing them”..like ”talk therapy” where someone talks about their problems and the therapist mainly listens without helping figure the person out from any problem. So is it all true?
    5: Most therapists have no idea what it is like to go through hardcore problems and to live a life full of pain and suffering and thus they cannot possibly even begin to help people. Is this true?
    6: Are the effects of medication or therapy permanent? and why?
    7: One article said that for some people some therapy can make things even worse. So what do they do?
    8: If therapy is very effective then when is medication prescribed?
    9: Do therapists ever felt like they don’t have a solution for someone’s problem? If yes, what to do in this case?
    10: I watched your video ”why i quit being a therapist”. so as our mental health industry is so broken, it means therapists and forms of therapy are bad and useless?
    11: Finally, how can we find a good therapist?

    • Hi AV,
      I’ll answer your questions as best I can (briefly), but I also want you to know that I’ve answered a lot of these questions in my videos.

      Here are two playlists of my videos that should be very helpful to you, or at least some of the videos on the list should be helpful:

      a playlist about psychotherapy — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f0Fi32LbXHA&list=PLRHLaIzKomTiyUtDGwvzc9YjcM3K9sdMG The first video in the playlist is the one you mentioned, so you can skip that one.
      A playlist about doing self-therapy — https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c95sfyv-M8M&list=PLRHLaIzKomTjZpFsYI0NPnHUteoRHLTiL

      And also a video of mine that goes into detail critiquing psychotherapy: https://youtu.be/G2-p4A7Bl6s

      So now I’ll answer your specific questions briefly.

      1: I often heard that many people say that therapy and meds don’t work. So what shall those people do?

      My answer: Well, I think in terms of effecting permanent change in people, and in their outlook to life, and their personalities, medications never work. They sometimes help people cope a little better for a while, and sometimes a long while, but often have terrible side effects even in the people they “help.” Good therapy, on the other hand, can work to effect permanent change, but it’s just very hard to find a good therapy. What worked for me is self therapy, and I provided my playlist on that above. I also have a self-therapy book for sale on this website under the book tab.

      2: Is there any evidence that Therapy ever does much for anyone ?

      My answer: Yes, there are quite a few studies showing how it helps people, even people with really serious problems including psychosis. I made films about the people in psychosis helped by therapy: http://wildtruth.net/films-recovery-schizophrenia/

      3: I heard that Therapy and psychology just gives a “positive effect” for people and it doesn’t solve any problem. Is that true?

      My answer: This can definitely be true of bad therapy. And bad therapy, unfortunately, is very common.

      4: psychology/therapy isn’t focused on diagnosing mental problems so that they can be solved. just talking about one’s daily life and the problems they experience on a day to day basis endlessly…!
      one guy commented that ”it just enables people to have emotional issues by putting them under a magnifying glass without fixing them”..like ”talk therapy” where someone talks about their problems and the therapist mainly listens without helping figure the person out from any problem. So is it all true?

      My answer: again, this can DEFINITELY be true of bad therapy, which is very common.

      5: Most therapists have no idea what it is like to go through hardcore problems and to live a life full of pain and suffering and thus they cannot possibly even begin to help people. Is this true?

      My answer: This is true of many therapists who have very little real life experience of their own. There are many of these therapists out there. There are also therapists who have suffered terribly in their life and are miserable people but have NOT learned to solve any of their own problems. These are therapists who are to be avoided. They have the experience of misery but not the experience of the solution. And there are many different varieties of solution, not just one.

      6: Are the effects of medication or therapy permanent? and why?

      My answer: I think this is just a rephrasing of questions 1, 2, and 3. But yes, the whole point of good therapy is that its effect is permanent — the person grows and changes and learns how to better deal with life’s problems. But also medications effects can sometimes, very depressingly, be VERY permanent— sometimes the NEGATIVE SIDE EFFECTS of medication are permanent. This is called neurological damage.

      7: One article said that for some people some therapy can make things even worse. So what do they do?

      My answer: Yes, sometimes therapy can makes things worse for people. I recommend self-therapy, or maybe trying to find a better therapist.

      8: If therapy is very effective then when is medication prescribed?

      My answer: Therapists and psychiatrists recommend medication when they have no other idea how to help people grow and change. When I was a therapist I myself never recommended medication. The dangers are too great and the act of recommending is a sign of failure of the mental health professional.

      9: Do therapists ever felt like they don’t have a solution for someone’s problem? If yes, what to do in this case?

      My answer: Yes, for sure this happens all the time, even with good therapists. They then either can keep trying to help the person, or they can try to recommend another therapist — or perhaps some completely different thing. Also, sometimes people are very stuck and are unable to implement changes in their lives. This requires more creativity on the part of the therapist.

      10: I watched your video ”why i quit being a therapist”. so as our mental health industry is so broken, it means therapists and forms of therapy are bad and useless?

      My answer: I would say most therapists are bad and useless, yes. And the mental health system is terribly flawed.

      11: Finally, how can we find a good therapist?

      My answer: That can be a real challenge. I never found one for myself, and I think I’ve tried maybe four or five therapists myself. But ultimately I think the best therapist for each of us is OUR OWN INDIVIDUAL SELF. That’s why I like self-therapy. However, I did make a video on 12 ways to find out if our therapist is good or not: https://youtu.be/xz3rsX63epE

      I hope this helps a bit!
      Daniel

      • Daniel, Thank you so much for your detailed explanation. it helped me a lot. Also thank you very much for fast reply.

    • Hi AV,
      Maybe you could share your questions here? Your name is anonymous so no one would know who you are, myself included. And then others might also benefit from seeing your questions and my answers.
      Wishing you the best,
      Daniel

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